wikiaddicted723: (Default)
[personal profile] wikiaddicted723
 Ah, the fresh smell of bullshit on a fine televised evening. My opinion of this particular episode is divided in two: the first part of that opinion states, clearly, that this may very well be the single most cringe-worthy hour of television to ever come from the likes of beautiful, full-of-mismanaged-potential FRINGE. The second part.....reminds me that half my heart is not objective, and likes to pretend that only the last minute of this episode exists. Because. [I mean, it's a twirly kiss scene nicely sponsored by Nissan Leaf. What more could you want *Mocks self*]

To quote my fellow reviewer, Wendy, this middle stretch of episodes in season 4 marks "the end of any pretence that the Fringe myth arc is coherent and internally consistent." I wholeheartedly agree with this sentiment, as the plot-oriented writing takes a sharp turn for the worst in between 4x09 and 4x16. It's heavy handed and full of plot holes. I must say, though, that in my case this is only so in regards to season 4. While the other seasons had their ups and downs, they were more or less internally coherent and the character development was always divine. I do not believe one can expect continuos peak performance of anything, least of all a television show under heavy threat of cancellation, and with new additions to the writing department that have not seen our characters grow with us [looking at you Fury]. However, I must give criticism where it is due, and I feel that this is a stretch of episodes where someone really dropped the ball from pretty high up.

My biggest criticism is that they had a superbly done arc finale (and I call it an "arc" instead of a season because seasons 1-3 were really just the first chapter in what could have been a long, long series, in an ideal world) in "The Day We Died," which, by virtue of its openness could have paved the way for SO. MANY. THINGS. And yet...and yet. 

Oh, well. They kissed and all was well for about 5 seconds [insert eye-rolling here]. Moving on...




Also, because I can't help myself(and in cases of abject plot-related terror, mock it, because what else is left):






 

Writers: Joel Wyman; Graham Roland [Sadly not your best moment, either of you]
Director: Joel Wyman [although, one has to admit, this is one visually pretty episode. Great composition].
Air Date: 23 March 2012

Synopsis: 
Peter is ready to abandon Boston and set-off for New York, wanting to avoid any influence he may have on Olivia's memory. A serial killer is using his proprietary knowledge of pheromones to lure and kill, all for want of love. The Observer finds a way to manipulate events and recontact Peter.

Most Memorable Quote:
WALTER: Mortius bestia -- roadkill. Specifically, an aromatic excretion from the castor sacs of the North American beaver used primarily for marking and mating. I went beaver hunting in Eastern Canada in the '70s. Of course, in those days, 'beaver' meant something else entirely.
[I think it says something about this episode that this is a memorable quote].

Links
Transcript
IGN
PopCultureNexus (seriously, go read it, it's awesome and its better written)
Polite Dissent

Fan Fiction
100% sure that there's a ton and no one needs help finding it. 98% sure that I wrote some. 


wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
I think of "The End of All Things" as the end of any pretense that the Fringe myth arc is coherent and internally consistent. The myth arc was already looking pretty frayed around the edges when Peter disappeared and came back with no explanation given. But September's speech in this scene makes it clear that the writers have lost track of where they've been and where they're headed as well.

THE OBSERVER: (1985 version) Forgive me, Doctor Bishop. I did not mean to disturb you. I am an admirer. (to Peter in the current timeline) Your father found the cure, but in my desire to witness the moment, I inadvertently distracted him from discovering it.
PETER: I already know all that. Walter told me, but what were you doing there?

Everyone following along already knows this, too. But the answer to the question should give us new and important information, right?
THE OBSERVER: (1985 version to Bishop) I'm sorry for disturbing you. (to Peter in the current timeline) It was important. You are important. (having returned to the spatial viewing platform) It was why I could not allow you to drown at the bottom of Reiden Lake, why it was necessary to allow the other Doctor Bishop to cure you instead. Despite my efforts to set things right, these actions only culminated in further corruption of the timeline. The war between the two universes drastically altered destinies and brought about a child that was not meant to be.
PETER: What child?
THE OBSERVER: Your son... Henry.
PETER: My what?
THE OBSERVER: He was born to the wrong Olivia Dunham due to a series of circumstances that never should have happened. This event... would have irrevocably altered everything that was to come.
PETER: (looks at an image of an infant manifested outside of the viewing platform) Henry. I have a son.
THE OBSERVER: Had. When you made the sacrifice to step into that machine, you were not the only one who ceased to exist. So would he. I believed at the time that would be the end of it. I cannot explain, but it is clear that I was wrong. You have managed to return in physical form. I suspect... this will provide an opportunity for you to put things right. She is the one... the Olivia Dunham from whom your shared future was meant to spring. This must be, and everything will be as it was intended. You must find a way... (alarmed) they are coming.

But...but... The war between the universes only occurred because of September's mistake. That is a given. September never explains why Peter is important--i.e. why September was in Walternate's lab in the first place--or why Henry's continued existence would have changed...anything, let alone everything.

In the original timeline, where Peter is cured by Walternate rather than Walter, Peter never would have met the Olivia Dunham of the Blueverse because he would have lived out his life in the Redverse. So why does September proclaim that the Amberverse Olivia (who according to September is really Blueverse Olivia) is the Olivia with whom Peter was meant to share a future? Meant by whom? Meant by God? Fate? September himself? Blueverse Peter died in childhood. Redverse Peter was never supposed to live in the Blueverse so how could Peter have been meant to be with Blueverse Olivia! THIS MAKES NO SENSE, SEPTEMBER Fringe writers.

September doesn't have a clue why Peter reappeared after the machine erased him. Nor do we. (Nor do the writers, apparently.) But this seems to imply that the true purpose of the machine was to eliminate Peter, but that he somehow got it to build the bridge before he was erased.

But hey, Peter and Olivia are back together again, so it's all good. September said it, so it must be true.

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Writer: David Fury
Director: Jeff Hunt
Originally aired: 24 Feb 2012

Synopsis:
Olivia has been kidnapped by David Robert Jones, who forces her to watch him torture Nina Sharp in an effort to activate her powers. Except now Olivia barely remembers Nina Sharp because she's losing the memories of her present life. She tells David Robert Jones that without Peter at her side, she can't use her powers. Peter gets kidnapped and brought to her. Olivia proceeds to fry one of Jones's minions. Jones, Nina Sharp--who it turns out is in cahoots with Jones--and his remaining minion attempt to flee. Strangely, there is another Nina Sharp in FBI custody. Also, Walter is still blaming Peter for Olivia's memory issues. No, Walter. Don't blame poor Peter for this mess. It's those damn writers again.

Most Memorable Quote:
See above.

Links:
Transcript
The A.V. Club
EW recap
LA Times Showtracker
Polite Dissent

Fanfiction:
Coda by Kerithwyn
Summary: Olivia, immediately after "The End of All Things."
Through the Night and Down the Hills by Monanotlisa
Summary: Amber!verse post-ep for 4x14 The End of All Things.
Family Business by yours truly, Wendelah1.
Summary: pre-series fic. "It's very good of you to take on raising two young girls, especially now, given your other obligations."
Failure of Success by cat_77
Summary: Peter really just wants to go home, or at least the closest thing he can get to it.
wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
"How about a non-mad scientist who was trying to do good and had something go wrong?" - Wendelah complaining about the plethora of episodes about mad scientists on Fringe.

The moral is clear: be careful what you wish for. This week's episode is a creepy take on that theme featuring a scientist whose attempt at creating a better human being results in a brood of hive-minded murderers. I'd say something went wrong all right. Very wrong.

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Writer: Robert Chiappetta (story), Glen Whitman (story), Monica Owusu-Breen (teleplay), Alison Schapker (teleplay)
Director: Joe Chappelle
Originally aired: 17 February 2012

Synopsis: When an institutionalized schizophrenic patient describes a recent murder in detail, the Fringe team investigates. Olivia now remembers her three year relationship with Peter in vivid detail—except she's really only known him three months, so what's up with that, Fringe writers? Peter now believes she's his Olivia, too, which is convenient for all. Meanwhile, Walter and Agent Lee discover that the Cortexiphan stored at Massive Dynamic is missing—and that Olivia has recently been dosed with the drug.

Most Memorable Quote:
OWEN FRANK: (regarding his attempt to create a better human being) Can you imagine that? The hubris of trying to improve upon God?

Well, yeah, because it's a major theme of the series. This episode foreshadows the upcoming William Bell arc.

Links:
Transcript
A.V. Club
EW Recap
Polite Dissent

Fanfiction:
Worlds on Fire by kerithwyn
wendelah1: (Olivia in glasses)
[personal profile] wendelah1
Olivia is remembering experiences she's never had and having dreams she shouldn't be dreaming. The two universes are colliding in rural Vermont. Are these two bizarre phenomena related--or aren't they? Stay tuned.

Now, I'm not a physicist, but doesn't it stand to reason that if two universes were to collide, the result would not be this wishy-washy, on-off, halfway stuff. At best, these people would be dead; at worst their matter would explode. As in KA-BOOM! Besides, a man with two irises couldn't see straight. A woman with two sets of teeth in one jaw couldn't talk right. And a man who sprouted a second head would not be stumbling around like a zombie!

Aside from the crazy-ass physics, there is much medical fail in this episode. For one thing, Walter might have been able to do a direct transfusion from person to person but unless there was heparin in that IV bag, his blood would clot before it reached the victim. For another, how is it that in no time at all, Walter was able find double the usual number of chromosomes in the woman's blood? That's quite some laboratory set-up for a little rural high school.

I can keep doing this all night because this episode made no-sense-at-all. But it didn't need to, did it? Its plot is designed to foreshadow the eventual disappearance of this timeline's Olivia Dunham.

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Writer: Graham Roland, J.R. Orsi
Director: David Straiton
Originally aired: 10 February, 2012

Synopsis:
The Fringe team investigates a commercial plane crash in rural Vermont that features bizarre electro-magnetic disturbances. In service of the plot, Walter, Peter and Olivia drive to the small town of Westfield, Vermont--and find they can't leave. They discover to their horror that the town's residents have nearly all died or gone crazy or both. Using some very questionable science, Walter deduces that the Westfield in this universe has merged with the Westfield in the other universe, with catastrophic consequences.

Most Memorable Quote:
OLIVIA: No becau...(slurred) Oh, Peter, I don't know how to explain it, but that feels like there was somebody else in my, uh -- in my head. Here... take this. (relinquishes her weapon) I – I - I'm scared that -- that what's happening to the other people in this town is happening to me.

Links:
Transcript
A.V. Club
EW recap
Polite Dissent

Fanfiction:
There's probably plenty of shippy Peter/Olivia post-eps. I haven't read them.
wendelah1: (Astrid reading)
[personal profile] wendelah1
"Making Angels" is notable for finally creating an episode in which Jasika Nicole gets to showcase her talent. Other than that, it's a particularly stupid variant of the Fringe mad scientist run amuck scenario.

I enjoyed it. Astrid was sadly underutilized during the course of the series. Unfortunately, this episode did not signal a course correction.

Yeah, I've got nothing. Edit: except fic recs! And I'm late with the post, too.

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Writer: Akiva Goldsman, Joel Wyman, Jeff Pinkner
Director: Charles Beeson
Originally aired: 03 Feb 2012

Synopsis:
After the death of her father, the Other Side's Agent Farnsworth visits Astrid in this universe to talk about family issues. A former MIT professor, turned TSA Agent, uses his intellect, and an Observer device left behind by September at Reiden Lake, to play God with the lives of others. The Observers finally notice that September didn't follow orders. Peter isn't erased from existence. Whoops. I guess they've been busy mucking around in the future.

Most Memorable Quote:
ASTRID: Olivia told me about you. But it's nice to meet you personally in the flesh.
AGENT FARNSWORTH: (deadpan) All personal meetings are in the flesh.
ASTRID: Yes, I - I suppose they are.

Links:
transcript
A.V. Club
Polite Dissent

Fanfiction:
1. Not exactly a post-ep, but an AU Astrid-centric fic that I wish had been longer. I think it was written for a comment ficathon.
The Air There Breaks by ALC Punk. Summary: Astrid is magic and gets to save the universe.

2. Also not a post-ep but it's Alternate Astrid-centric. It features a rare pairing I happen to love.
Fraternization by kalisgirl. Summary: Astrid has always been different, but that doesn't mean she can't have what everyone else has.

3. A Yuletide fic from way back in 2010.
everything in its right place. How about that title, folks? This is Redverse Astrid. Summary: In the alternate universe, Astrid notices some changes in Agent Dunham.
wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
If it wasn't already clear to the viewers that the Fringe writers are lost in the television plot arc wilderness, "Forced Perspective" should clue them in. Remember the early first season episode, "The Ghost Network," about the guy who was supposedly having visions of Pattern-related events? Better yet, remember The X-Files episode, "Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose," about the psychic who can predict exactly when and how someone will die? The psychic teenager, Emily, makes drawings and hands them to the victims, hoping that it will serve as a warning. But it never works. They die anyway and she feels sad. Psychic Clyde tries to sell his clients life insurance by telling them when they're going to die. Strangely, that selling technique doesn't work so well. She hates her ability and dies at the end because it was just her time, I guess. Clyde hates his ability and takes his own life in the end. This episode is so boring and so pointless. "Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose" was one of the best episodes of television I've ever seen. Oh, and they ripped off some of the dialogue from "Monday"--remember the scene with the guy with the explosives strapped to his chest in the bank?

What else? We're supposed compare Olivia to Emily: both are gifted children who were studied by Massive Dynamic. Olivia's ability was induced by the Cortexiphan trials. Emily's gift is due to abnormal brain waves--or is it? Emily knows she's going to die because she's psychic. Olivia knows she's going to die because September told her so. Ugh. It's all so heavy-handed. The Fickle Finger of Fate!

During her scenes with Olivia, I kept wondering if our side's Nina Sharp has already been kidnapped and replaced by the Evil Nina Sharp.

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Writer: Ethan Gross
Director: David Solomon
Originally aired:

Synopsis: The Fringe team searches for a girl who predicted when and how a man would die, after she hands him a picture of the moment of his death: pierced through the chest with a steel beam.

Most Memorable Quote:
JIM MALLUM: Em, please. They're on their way. Can you just hold on?
EMILY MALLUM: I think you were right. Everyone has a purpose. They saved those people today. Maybe that was mine.

Links:
Transcript
A.V. Club
Den of Geek
Polite Dissent
Pop Culture Nexus

Fanfiction:
Nope. My head canon: despite what Nina Sharp tells Olivia, Emily's mysterious brain condition resulted from experimentation--just not by scientists who can be connected to Massive Dynamic.
wikiaddicted723: (Default)
[personal profile] wikiaddicted723
Like it's predecessor,  this is a rather plot heavy episode, and one of the few (and sometimes far between) highlights of the season. The exploration of the two universes both apart and in contrast with one another,  plays out beautifully, without heavy exposition. Pleasantly, this happens as a consequence of the overall plot, which is interspersed with wonderful character moments (DRJ's interrogation for one, and the ways in which Fringe Division on the other side seems to be able to combine, in its people,  the hard operator military bearing and though with the cunning one would more easily associate with spy craft. There is definitely a heavier intelligence aspect under the surface of the team we've been shown. Take, for instance, Altliv's marksmanship and its most common uses in the field as ways of dispatching an enemy quietly, from the shadows. Something more to explore).
 
The entirety of this season so far has made this version of Olivia seem much more detached than the one we're accustomed to. She seems to be more stoic, less prone to show her feelings, or act on them while in the field. While still definitely guided by her heart, she seems almost calculating at times. This episode,  in contrast, returns to an Olivia who is closer to ours, who is guided there by her own fear of mortality. She has also allowed this series of attacks and affronts by DRJ to  become personal, which I believe to be less frequent for this Olivia than it was for ours. 
 
Also central to these two episodes is the matter of trust: both in oneself and in the people around us. This will continue to be a central theme to season from here on.  
 
As an aside: it's interesting to me that these two episodes seem designed to show both how Peter has grown as a character and how he has remained the same. He wants so badly to be selfish, to do not be burdened with the responsibility of more worlds that he believes are not his own, and yet...and yet he helps, because he knows the danger DRJ presents to these people who are images of those he loves, and that love compels him to do right by them, in all their versions. It's a nice mirror to Olivia and Lincoln, who are both acting for personal reasons, Olivia perhaps more selfishly than Lincoln, as Lincoln seeks vengeance for his partner, and Olivia for what was done to her.  
 
In hindsight, my only wish is that the rest of the season had kept the balance demonstrated here. Alas, there's nothing to be done about it now, except WRITE ALL THE FIC. Yes?

 
 
 
Writer: Alison Schapker; Monica Owusu-Breen
Director: Joe Chappelle
Originally aired: 20 Jan 2012
 
Synopsis:
Peter's gains support in the alternate universe and unites the two sides in an effort to eradicate the shapeshifter threat and their creator. Walter assesses his life and decides to participate in the effort.
 
Most Memorable Quote: 
LINCOLN LEE: And what is it you need? 
DAVID JONES: From you? Nothing. You don't have the authority. (willingly surrenders) Take me to your leader.
 
[One has to love Jared Harris smugly joyful delivery of this overdramatized line].
 
PETER: We're leaving. 
AGENT LEE: Wait a minute -- we might finally get some answers. We should stay here, and we should assist with the interrogation. 
PETER: No. I finally got Walternate to agree to help me. I don't think the way to say thank you is to tell him how to do his job. 
AGENT LEE: (pressuring) So that's it. Yeah, you... you got what you wanted. 
PETER: Yes, I got what I wanted. And whatever he finds out in that interrogation he's gonna share with you. So you got what you came for. And now all I want to do is get back to the other side, study the blueprints -- 
AGENT LEE: I need to be a part of this investigation. I lost a partner. (micro perspective) 
PETER: I lost a universe! (macro perspective) 
 
[Yeah, dude, Lincoln, I'm sorry but the scale of your grievances does not compare].
 
Links: 
 
Fanfiction:
Not nearly enough. NOT. NEARLY. ENOUGH.
wendelah1: (Peter and Olivia)
[personal profile] wendelah1
I'd forgotten how plot-heavy the episode is, chock full of significant meetings and partial reveals. Peter sees his parents again for the first time. Agent Lee has his first, inauspicious meeting with Alt!Livia. "Who the hell are you?" she asks Peter, the father of her child in the other timeline. The face-to-face meeting of the two Lincolns is a fan favorite.

More timeline differences surface: Colonel Broyles is compromised and working for David Robert Jones, but Walternate isn't as bad a guy as Peter had originally thought. Both governments are being infiltrated by the new alien/human hybrids human/shape-shifter hybrids; moreover, Walternate isn't the genius behind them this time around. Charlie is still nowhere to be found--is he still on his honeymoon? There's no hint that the Other Side's Lincoln has feelings for their Olivia, but the one on this side is already mooning over ours. Well, we know how that turned out. Olivia has never tried to crossover to the other universe and as far as we know, she can't.

If you've found other changes in the timeline, please leave them in the comments.

There's one other meeting worth a mention: Olivia's fateful encounter with September. See most memorable quote.

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Writer: David Fury and Graham Roland
Director: Jeannot Szwarc
Originally aired: 13 Jan 2012

Synopsis:
After being given the brushoff by Walter, Peter asks for Olivia's help to visit the Other Side. Peter wants Walternate's help to get back to his own universe. Olivia and Agent Lee put in a requisition to get Walter's quantum mirror out of storage at Massive Dynamic to use for an unauthorized reconnaissance mission/Peter's visit with his father. Worst idea ever, people. Doesn't our Fringe division know about the Show-Mes in this timeline? Doesn't Peter? You can't take a taxi or use public transportation without swiping your I.D. first.

Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't that the same device that was responsible for damaging two universes when Walter used it? What possible reason could they put on the req to Massive Dynamic that wouldn't put up a massive red flag?

Most Memorable Quote:
THE OBSERVER: (strained) I have come to tell you something... Olivia.
OLIVIA: How did you know my name? How do you know my -- (holsters weapon. looks at his chest) you've been shot?
THE OBSERVER: I came to tell you... I have looked at all possible futures... and in every one, the result is the same. You have to die.

Links:
transcript
More links coming in the morning.

Fanfiction:
About that. Use the search engine and put in Lincoln Lee/Alternative Lincoln Lee.
wendelah1: Astrid and Walter from Fringe (Astrid and Walter: working)
[personal profile] wendelah1
In the original version of The Invisible Man, the novel by H.G. Wells, the scientist turns invisible after he experiments on himself; however, "Wallflower" is a Fringe episode, so naturally the test subject is a child, in this case, a terminally ill infant. Shortly after his supposed death from an unknown genetic disorder, infant Eugene was kidnapped by a subsidiary of Massive Dynamic, and turned into a captive, human guinea pig. Eventually, he manages to escape and is presumed dead in a laboratory fire.

He makes a home for himself that resembles the laboratory he grew up in. He starts experimenting on himself, attempting to reverse what was done to him to become visible again. To get the skin pigment he needs for this process, he resorts to murder.

Almost from the day he was born, Eugene was treated as less than human. It comes as no surprise that he is willing to use other people, treating them as he was treated, seeing them as nothing more than a means to an end.

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Writer: Matt Pitts and Justin Doble
Director: Anthony Hemingway
Originally aired: November 18, 2011

Synopsis: Olivia is suffering from migraines, Agent Lee is having insomnia, Peter is trying to get back to where he's from, and Astrid is seeing a therapist to cope with job stress. Oh, and an invisible entity is killing people and turning them white in the process. Fringe Division investigates.

Also, is Nina Sharp evil in this timeline? That last plot twist was a corker!

Most Memorable Quote:
OLIVIA: Do we have a name?
ASTRID: Uh-huh. Baby Boy Bryant. According to this, the blood sample we found at the crime scene belonged to a baby born on July 26, 1989, at Parkview Hospital in New York. And he died four days later -- July 30, 1989.
WALTER: Well, that's quite a quandary. Perhaps we're looking for a ghost after all.

Links:
Transcript
Entertainment Weekly
Polite Dissent
A.V. Club

Fanfiction:
Not that I'm aware of. Here's my headcanon/plot bunny: Eugene wasn't just kidnapped and experimented on by Evil Scientists, his "unknown genetic disorder" was engineered by those same scientists to turn him into their ideal test subject.
wendelah1: (Walter reading From Outer Space)
[personal profile] wendelah1
"And Those We've Left Behind," is the inevitable time loop episode, with a Fringe-y twist. The best known example of this science fiction trope is "Groundhog Day," but the concept dates back to science fiction stories from the forties. The X-Files episode "Monday" is another well-known example. The Fringe plot is a reworking of an old episode of Stargate SG-1, "Window of Opportunity," in which a scientist creates a time machine to see his dead wife. In the process, the scientist inadvertently traps the inhabitants of 14 different planets in his temporal loop. Raymond Green, the engineer in "And Those We've Left Behind," has a similar motive: his wife, Kate, was a brilliant theoretical physicist who is dying of early onset Alzheimer's disease. Raymond uses her ideas and his knowledge of electrical engineering to build a machine to return them to the time before she became ill.

This episode works well when it's focused on the plight of the Greens. Raymond has no idea of the damage he is doing to the world. He just wants his wife back. Even when confronted with the evidence, Raymond is too consumed with grief and guilt to do the right thing. Fortunately, Kate understands what is happening, to the world and to Raymond. To prevent her husband from moving house and rebuilding the machine, she erases all evidence of her scientific breakthrough, leaving behind only this note: "Raymond, I love you. How you repay me... Just love me and live your life."

This is a compelling, gut-wrenching scenario, and I was moved by how the writers worked out the Raymonds' fate. Their story certainly fits into the Fringe thematic continuum: Walter crossing universe to save Peter, Olivia crossing universes to save Peter, etc. But I don't see how the romance of Peter and Olivia is in any way comparable to the suffering of this ordinary, middle-aged couple. It's almost like Peter and Olivia haven't earned it yet. Don't get me wrong--I like Peter and Olivia just fine, as a pairing and as individuals--but so far, I can't see them as an epic romance, let alone one that literally transcends time and space.

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Writer: Robert Chiappetta and Glen Whitman
Director: Brad Anderson
Originally aired: 11 Nov 2011

Synopsis: The Fringe team investigates multiple time anomalies that are causing destruction and panic in the greater Boston area.

Most Memorable Quote:
RAYMOND GREEN: I can't go on without you. I don't want this for us. Kate, when you got sick, it happened so fast. And all the things that you were for me and all the things that you did for me... I didn't have a chance to be that for you. I thought we'd have more time.

KATE GREEN: This isn't living, Raymond. Living is what's beyond this room, beyond this house, out there in the world where you're supposed to be.

Links:
transcript
EW Fringe Recap: Bursting Bubbles
Polite Disent

Fanfiction:
Leave suggestions in the comments.
wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
This isn't a bad episode and it certainly has a lot going for it. "Novation" brings back Agent Lee to continue the plot arc begun in the season opener about the shape-shifter responsible for killing his partner. We discover that they are human-shapeshifter hybrids, an idea borrowed from The X-Files and given a Fringe-y twist. Peter uses his shifter expertise from the other timeline to strike a bargain with Fringe Division: his knowledge for a chance to plead his case with Walter Bishop.

We still don't know much about these shape-shifters, except that they're new to everyone, including Peter. And we don't know any more about how Peter reappeared in this timeline, despite being erased from it by the Observers. This episode continues Peter's journey to find out where he belongs, and Lincoln's quest to find out who's responsible for the death of Robert (which mirrors Olivia's first season investigation into the death of John Scott). And, of course, it's still very much about the redemption of Walter Bishop. What this season is not about is Olivia Dunham. To me, she feels very much at the periphery of this season so far, and that is a shame, especially since it didn't have to be that way.

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screencap by ladymanson.com

Writer: Graham Roland and J.R. Orci
Director: Paul Holahan
Originally aired: 04 Nov 2011

Synopsis: Nadine Park, the defective shape-shifter who got away in the season opener, makes her comeback appearance. To no one's surprise, she's looking for a former employee of the Ninth Circle of Hell Massive Dynamic, one Dr. Malcolm Truss, whose research involved tissue regeneration. She finds him and abducts him at gunpoint. In one of the series' less credible sequences, after Nadine twists his arm--and breaks it--Truss goes ahead and fixes her, even though he knows she murdered his wife. During the investigation, Peter succeeds in making himself useful to the Fringe Division, but they put him back in his cell anyway. Better luck next episode, Peter.

Most Memorable Quote:
WALTER: Every day... for the past twenty-five years... I've tried to imagine what you would look like as a man... my son. But I don't deserve this. I don't deserve you. I realize now this was my punishment. You were sent to tempt me, to see if I would repeat the mistakes of the past. You shouldn't be here.
PETER: Walter, no.
WALTER: Wherever you came from, however you got here, it doesn't matter. I can't help you.

Links:
Transcript
The A.V. Club
Den of Geek
hitfix
EW: Joshua Jackson on his big return

Fanfiction:
Leave suggestions in the comments!
wendelah1: (Olivia and Lincoln)
[personal profile] wendelah1
The part of the plot for Subject 9 which concerns the fate of subject 9 himself, Cameron James, is deeply unsatisfying to me. We don't find out much about the Cortexiphan trials themselves. We don't learn why they were being conducted in the first place. This is the first Astrid has even heard of them. We do learn that Olivia set fire to the lab, just as she did in the other timeline. Subsequently she ran away and never went back. Is this because she'd already killed her stepfather? Or is it because she didn't meet up with Peter in the tulip field?

long entry is long )

One last question and then I'll shut up. Did the episode mean to imply that Olivia was creating the electro-magnetic fields herself and that she's responsible for pulling Peter out of limbo? This honestly never occurred to me until I read the transcript.

OLIVIA: This isn't me. I am not doing this. (inadvertently creating the anomaly with her latent Cortexiphan abilities)

Was this the fandom's consensus? If her abilities were latent until being triggered by Jones later in the season, how could she do anything with them this early?

 photo 327e1af5-9fae-48b4-b844-926ff9eb013c_zps0e3768d2.jpg


Writer: Akiva Goldsman, Joel Wyman, and Jeff Pinkner
Director: Joe Chappelle
Originally aired: 14 Oct 2011

Synopsis: Olivia is being pursued by an entity that turns out to be an electromagnetic field. That field was somehow being generated by Peter's disappearance and reappearance in the timeline. Also, Olivia decides Walter isn't crazy enough to send back to the mental institution. We also meet one of the Cortexiphan subjects, Cameron James.

Most Memorable Quote:
CAMERON JAMES: When I had my first experience, I thought something was coming after me, too... until I realized I was doing it to myself.
OLIVIA: You think I'm doing this... that I'm bringing this on myself?

Links:
Transcript
The A.V. Club
Den of Geek
Ken Tucker (of EW)
Polite Dissent
Sarah Stegall

Critical opinion was divided on this one.

Fanfiction:
Double Exposure by Icepixie
Triptych by Monanotlisa

I'm sure there's more out there but there's no time! Leave suggestions in comments--especially if you wrote something. I want to read it.
wendelah1: (Olivia and Lincoln)
[personal profile] wendelah1
This episode features a killing sentient fungus, which Walter posits is a new, rapidly evolving life-form. Inexplicably, it has become psychically bonded to a lonely young boy, who wandered into its tunnel habitat. The plot reminds me of two old X-Files episodes, "Schizogeny," with its murderous old orchard trees, and "Fire Walker," the season two episode with the deadly, exploding fungal spores. The Fringe science being done here isn't scientific in the least. By the end, I was half-expecting Agent Mulder to show up, flashlight in hand, protesting the extermination of the new life form. "We need to study it, Broyles!"

The only memorable scene comes at the very end when Walter Bishop confesses to Olivia that he's been having hallucinations. She counters by showing him a drawing of Peter, who has been making appearances in her dreams.

WALTER: Who is he?
OLIVIA: I don't know. I've been running facial recognition through inter-agency databases, including Interpol, but nothing's shown up.
WALTER: (motivated) A shared vision like this... He must be real! And if he's real... We have to find him.

Don't worry, you will.

 photo 0242d828-7701-49fa-8f34-e526f6db3598_zpsaa474bd8.jpg


Writer: David Fury
Director: Miguel Sapochnik
Originally aired: October 7, 2011

Synopsis: When Sentient Fungus Attacks! Also, Walter continues to be plagued with what he thinks are hallucinations, but which are in actuality visions of Peter Bishop, bleeding through into this timeline.

Most Memorable B-Movie Quote:
BROYLES: I just got word from one of our teams. The fungus has reached a subway platform in Midtown. We can't contain this thing. We have to move on it now.
OLIVIA: You gave Walter two hours. There's still time.
BROYLES: I'm sorry, but you know as well as I do we can't sacrifice countless other lives to save one boy.

Am I the only one who started laughing at this?

Links:
Transcript
The A.V. Club
The Fungus Among Us Entertainment Weekly.
The Non-Science of Fringe: Alone in the World - Weak Interactions.
A Sense of Isolation by Sarah Stegall. Her website is back!

Fanfiction:
Distant Early Warning by kerithwyn.
Please leave other suggestions in the comments.
wendelah1: (Olivia and Lincoln)
[personal profile] wendelah1
I suppose I should make a confession. I started this rewatch because I needed to research the series for a long crossover fic, which is set during season four, post-"One Night in October." I still haven't written past the opening chapter but now that we've reached this point, maybe that will get me writing again.

 photo 3d06d886-c281-4841-b036-c1a4995fbc9e_zps0ce2ee20.jpg

The episode fits well into the overarching themes of Fringe. Because they are working the same case, we get to compare and contrast the two Olivias. We find out another divergence from the original timeline: this Olivia Dunham didn't just shoot her stepfather, she killed him. This timeline's Olivia was kidnapped and replaced by the Other Side's Olivia but now I'm wondering if she was experimented on, or if she was, was it in the same way. On rewatch, it's not clear to me if she has a prior history with their Fringe division. Maybe she wasn't brainwashed into thinking she was their Olivia and was simply imprisoned the entire time? Please, discuss. Help me out here, folks.

Since Sarah Stegall's website is offline, I'm just going to use the quote from her SFScope review that's in Wikipedia.
In what may well be the best-written episode of the entire show, Fringe brilliantly exploits its own alternate-world structure to show us the transformative power of love, a power so strong it can redeem the dark impulses that drive a fiend. And it does so with verve and heart, without sappy sentimentality. There is madness and love and tragedy and horror here, all seasoned by some fine performances and top notch writing.

What she said.

Writer: Alison Schapker and Monica Owusu-Breen
Director: Brad Anderson
Originally aired: September 30, 2011

Synopsis: The Other Side asks for the assistance of Fringe Division to catch a serial killer by bringing over his double--who happens to be a college professor and criminal profiler--to their universe, in the hope he'll provide new insight into the psyche of the murderer. All does not go as planned...

Most Memorable Quote:
PROFESSOR MCCLENNAN: (to Olivia) You know what they say. That even when it's the darkest, we can step into the light.
OLIVIA: (privately. walking the corridors) He knows what she taught him, but he can't remember who she is. How is that possible?
BROYLES: At the risk of sounding sentimental... I've always thought there were people who leave an indelible mark on your soul. An imprint that can never be erased.

Like Peter, perhaps? Subtle writers are subtle.

Links:
Transcript
LA Times Recap
Entertainment Weekly
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, 2.0—Fringe's "One Night in October". Sarah Stegall.
Thank God for the Wayback Machine.

Fanfiction:
Intersection by Kerwithyn. Two Olivias in one place is a lot for Lincoln to cope with. This is part of a series.
Threat Assessment by yours truly. Crossover with The X-Files. Hired as a consultant, Mulder meets with Special Agent Olivia Dunham to get some answers about John McClennan.
put your quarter down on me by monanotlisa. This-our- Olivia may play her cards close to the chest. But know this: she does play.

Please leave other suggestions and I'll edit them into the post.
wendelah1: (Olivia and Lincoln)
[personal profile] wendelah1
For the fourth season, the Fringe showrunners made the fateful decision to reboot the series. They've imagined an alternative universe where September didn't save Peter Bishop from drowning. As the season progresses, I'll be cataloging the resulting changes. This is what I've noticed so far. In this universe/timeline/whatever, Walter Bishop is more emotionally fragile, volatile, and fearful. After being released from the mental hospital to work for Fringe, Walter took up residence in his old lab at Harvard, working and even sleeping there. Instead of Peter and Walter, Astrid works closely with Olivia and takes a more active role in their investigations. This Olivia Dunham seems different, too. She's colder, more socially isolated, more analytic and less empathetic.

 photo dbe8712a-3d8a-4f62-b016-9eba65c7d50c_zpsdcfab620.jpg


Writer: J.H. Wyman and Jeff Pinkner
Director: Joe Chapelle
Originally aired: September 23, 2011

Synopsis: Agent Lincoln Lee comes to work for Fringe division because in the course of an unrelated investigation, his FBI partner Robert is murdered by a new kind of shapeshifter. Peter Bishop may not be quite as absent from this timeline as the Observers had once thought.

Most Memorable Quote:
Lincoln: You understand what you're saying? Those families are going to spend the rest of their lives wondering what happened to their loved ones. Looking for answers. Can you imagine what that would be like? To have that -- that hole in your life.
Walter: People die. It happens. Sometimes they even die twice.

Links:
transcript

Reviews and Recaps:
The A.V. Club
Polite Dissent
Den of Geek
Entertainment Weekly
And then there's this: Why Is Olivia Such a Jerk? by Charlie Jane Anders on iO9.

Fanfiction:
I admit I had some issues with "Neither Here Nor There," too. As we re-watched the episode, my husband remarked, "Did they get Chris Carter (creator of The X-Files) to write this?" Suddenly it came to me. They're hiding the truth from the American people to avoid drawing attention to the Fringe division. They're telling lies to the families of the victims, while Walter gleefully harvests tissue for experimentation from the bodies of their loved ones. They believe anything they do can be justified: after all, they're saving the planet. The Fringe Division has been turned into the moral equivalent of The X-Files Consortium.

Title: Inspired by True Events.
Author: Wendelah1
Summary: For a top secret division, they were pretty easy to find once he had the camera feeds in hand. The fic goes AU somewhere around scene five.

Title: Both Here and There
Author: Kerithwyn
Summary: Olivia thinks about one Lincoln and encounters another.

Add your suggestions in the comments and I'll edit them into the post.
wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
I hope you've all enjoyed your holidays and are caught up and ready for season four. One of our moderators is sitting out this round so if there is anyone in the community who would like to step up and post an episode or two (or however many you'd like to take on), please PM me. So far, [profile] wikiaddicted and I have January 20, 23, February 6, 13, 17, and March 10 covered but everything else is up for grabs.

Season Four Schedule )


[community profile] fringe_rewatch
Every Tuesday and Friday, beginning January 20



Please snag the banner if you want to help get the word out. Or make your own!

See you all next week.
wikiaddicted723: (Default)
[personal profile] wikiaddicted723
 Two reactions still come to mind immediately after re watching this episode: 1) that was amazing and 2) what the fuck did I just watch?
 
That's a pretty good descriptor of the best moments of this show, regardless of the season, and The Day We Died is up there with the best of them.
 
My one complaint: it felt, before Walter's reveal, as though the First People mythology was somehow grander, and slightly more complex than what was presented. Why disguise it as something so old and mysterious when understanding was needed swiftly? (other than, you know, because they needed to fill in 22 episodes...).


 



 
 
Writer: Jeff Pinkner; Joel Wyman; Akiva Goldsman
Director: Joe Chappelle
Original Air Date: 06 May 2011
 
Synopsis
After only a minute in the ancient device, Peter gains a week long view of this universe in 2026 with intimate knowledge of the fate of the alternate universe. He temporarily returns to the present... and learns his ultimate mission - he has to save both universes.
 
Most Memorable Quote:
PETER: Hello, Walter.
WALTER: Must be bad if they're letting you see me.
PETER: It is.
WALTER: I heard a rumor that the Sun was burning out. They don't tell me much in here.
PETER: The Sun is still shining.
WALTER: I also hear there's been a massive increase in Kappa radiation.
PETER: That one's true. A wormhole opened in Central Park, right in the center of Sheep's Meadow. Took us months but... we were finally able to Amber it over.
WALTER: A wormhole shouldn't emit that type of radiation. Not unless it's a wormhole through time.
 
[There's so many...]
 
 
PETER: I understand now. Walter? Walter! I understand now. I understand what the machine does. I know what it's capable of, and I know where it came from.
WALTER: The First People?
PETER: Yes, The First People, Walter, but The First People are us -- you, most specifically and maybe Ella and Astrid -- I don't know. I don't know who it was that took the machine back through time. But I know something else. I've seen Doomsday, and it is worse than anything you could possibly imagine. This isn't a war that can be won. Our two worlds are inextricable. If one side dies, we all die. So I've torn holes in both the universes and they lead here, to this room. A bridge so that we can begin to work together to fix --
 
Links 
 
Fanfiction
Rec it in the comments! There's a lot.
wikiaddicted723: (Default)
[personal profile] wikiaddicted723
 Great episode. These three consecutive finale episodes are not only a great season ender, but a very convincing analogue to the season two's last two episodes--especially in the game changing department (although season three arguably handled that change much better than the following season 4).
 
It's only sad that we never really get to see Sam again, despite meeting his corpse in season 5. He was a great character. Underused, like so many.
 
Also of note is Peter's brief aphasia. It looked as though he thought he'd lived on the other side his entire life, which is a good teaser of something else that could have been done for season 4 (and wasn't).

 
 
 
Writer: Alison Schapker; Monica Owusu-Breen
Director: Tom Yatsko
Original Air Date: 29 April 2011

Synopsis:
Olivia and Sam Weiss determine a new way to access the Wave Sink Device. A disoriented Peter slips out of the hospital and finds his way to Liberty Island. Casualties mount as anomalies take a devastating toll on the populace of the Northeastern United States.

Most Memorable Quote:
SAM WEISS: (standing in the hangar bay studying the large weapon) It wasn’t supposed to happen this way.
OLIVIA: What do you mean - 'this way'?
SAM WEISS: It’s already on.
OLIVIA: Yes, it’s been on for the past thirty-two hours.
SAM WEISS: So how can that be? This doesn’t make sense.
OLIVIA: Walter thinks that the machines are quantum entangled and that this machine was triggered when they activated theirs on the other side.
SAM WEISS: Even so, how did they turn it on in the first place? This machine was built for Peter. Only he can operate it.
OLIVIA: Well, he tried, but the machine sent him flying.
SAM WEISS: (throws pen at it and watches as it deflects and buries in nearby piece of equipment) It’s hot-wired. It’s tricked into thinking he’s already inside. That’s why it’s repelling anyone or anything trying to enter.
OLIVIA: So you’re thinking that it’s malfunctioning.
SAM WEISS: What I’m saying is it’s frustrated... in a manner of speaking. That’s why you’re seeing all this damage out in the world. It’s not a Doomsday Device, but it’s acting like one.
OLIVIA: Okay, so how do we stop it?
 
 
Links
 
 
Fanfiction
A bunch. Post some recs in the comments!
wendelah1: (Fringe Rewatch)
[personal profile] wendelah1
This is my third complete rewatch of season three and I still believe this is where the series peaked. The dramatic tension gets ratcheted up so high in this episode that it's nearly unbearable. The romantic Peter and Olivia scene at the beginning of the episode was lovely, if short-lived. And then the writers have to go and ruin everything in season four. There are so many great dramatic moments, too: Walter's plea to God, AltLivia's confrontation with Walternate, AltLivia's poignant good-bye to Lincoln and Henry as she heads off to try to save our world. There was even a welcome bit of humor when Olivia wakes up in Peter's bed on Naked Tuesday. "Your father is walking around naked!" One nit-pick: I'm irritated at how the writers dumbed down our Olivia. As she headed off to Massive Dynamic, she had to have known that Peter was planning to get into the machine.

 photo 83c7e677-df26-4e3a-babd-bba8a6ec4c94_zpsad6a2a6b.png


Writer: David Wilcox, Josh Singer, Graham Roland
Director: Jeannot Szwarc
Originally aired: April 22, 2011

Synopsis: Walternate and his minions power up the Machine on their side using Peter's DNA, which they have obtained from newborn Henry. Their plan is to sacrifice our world to save theirs. AltLivia is unsuccessful in her attempt to thwart the Secretary's plan and is caught and placed in a holding cell on Liberty Island. Likewise, Peter is unsuccessful at entering the machine to try to turn it off.

Most Memorable Quote: This was a tough one. But I finally picked Walter's scene in the chapel.
"I don't know my way around here. Other people, I suppose, find comfort being in chapels, speaking to you. I have no other place to turn. I asked you for a sign, and you sent it to me. A white tulip. And I was so grateful. Since then, in moments of deep despair, I have found solace in believing that you had forgiven me. I was willing to let him go. I was willing to let Peter die. I've changed. That should matter. God, I know my crimes are unforgivable. So punish me. Do what you want to me. But I beg you, spare our world." - Walter Bishop.

Links:
Transcript
Sarah Stegall
A.V. Club

Fanfiction:
Surprise! I have recs! All gen, however.
History Repeats Itself by Vehemently.
Summary: What is it: I just followed that thread all the way to the end of it.
Tagline: The FBI's security protocols absolutely suck on the other side. The agent on the phone acted like she recognized me.
Skeins also by Vehemently.
Summary: Now imagine what Ravelry is like, in that universe.
Where the rift is, the break is by yours truly.
Summary: Set in the Red!verse, before things changed. Missing scene for "6:02 AM EST." Lincoln and Henry wait for Olivia to return.
wendelah1: Astrid and Walter from Fringe (Astrid and Walter: working)
[personal profile] wendelah1
I didn't dislike this episode as much as I did first couple of viewings. The thing is, for what was—or perhaps I should say should have been—an Olivia-centric episode, we don't get to see much of Olivia or Anna Torv. We do find out that her father was an important man and that he was still alive when she was three years old. Was he the person responsible for her entering the Cortexiphan trials?

Downloading a person's consciousness into a computer? That tired cliché is the best your team of overpaid writers could come up with? "Tell Walter I knew the dog wouldn't hunt." Understatement of the season. And why would our Olivia have zeppelins floating around in her unconscious mind? Forgive me, but that doesn't compute.

 photo 95b0f95b-fd02-4b15-8eca-712fa2f5bf22_zps1a369cbc.png


Writer: Akiva Goldsman, Jeff Pinkner, Joel Wyman
Director: Joe Chapelle
Originally aired: 5 April 2011

Synopsis: Resolution of the cliff-hanger from "Stowaway." Walter and William Bell decide that if Olivia is too frightened to come to them, they'll have to go rescue her via the use of psychotropic drugs and some truly scary-looking metal hardware. Reluctantly, Peter goes, too. Astrid has to stay behind to babysit everyone, including Broyles who accidentally takes some LSD while trying to help Astrid clean up.

Most Memorable Quote:
WALTER: Belly... why are you a cartoon? (steps into the room and turns him and Peter into animation)
WILLIAM BELL: I'd ask yourselves the same question.

Links:
Transcript
Polite Dissent
Den of Geek
A.V. Club
Sarah Stegall. I'm going to miss her reviews when she quits on us the middle of next season.

Fanfiction:
Please leave suggestions in the comments. Or write some!
image courtesy of cortexiphancaps

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